Sober Active Canada: Alex Talbot brings the sober active movement to Canada….

Alexandra Talbot is a Canadian Recovery Advocate, Certified Health and Life Coach, Competitive Bodybuilder on Team Carlie’s Angels and now the founder of Sober Active Canada.

Alex is an addict and alcoholic with three years sober. She has recognized the power to choose recovery and has made it her highest priority the last 3 years – one day, one rep, one meal at a time. For 28 years, Alex abused substances in complete disregard for her health and wellness. Substances took from her any dignity she may have had. With a burning desire to change her life’s course, she finally surrendered and turned it over, flipped the script, woke up and leveled up some 38 months ago. Alex will tell you she believes “Recovery is a workout, so work out your recovery. Fitness and nutrition have proven viable approaches to my recovery, complemented by my 12-step program. At 41 years of age, I’m in the best mental, physical and spiritual shape of my life – brain, body, spirit fit!” I asked Alex what advice she has for others, here is what she had to say: “A healthy self is to heal thy self. Providing a judgment-free environment open to all people in, stages of and pathways to recovery, Sober Active Canada fosters health, hope and healing amongst its community of like-minded individuals actively addicted to bettering themselves. Its locally based, Canada-wide events effect and support lifestyle change through beginner workout and physical group activities coupled with 12-step style format meetings.”

You can reach Alex as follows: IF: @soberactivecanada E-mail: soberactivecanada@gmail.com IG: alexytalbot_healthyxxl E-mail: healthyxxl@gmail.com For more information on Spiritual Adrenaline, visit www.spiritualadrenaline.com

Our Relationship with Superman: In Memory of David Clark, a founder of the Sober Active Movement…

By: Rob Archuletta & Scott Strode

I’d love to tell you David Clark and I were good friends, but we weren’t.  Like many others, I stood in awe of David from the sidelines.  I watched his videos and read his Facebook posts. I first met David in 2012 when my wife Sheena was running an Ultra Marathon to benefit victims of the Aurora Colorado shooting.  David not only ran the race but won it.  Afterwards, he took the time to speak with Sheena and the rest of the Addict2Athlete team.   David shared his story with us.  The members of our team shared their stories of addiction and recovery as well.  From that point on, it became clear that we were all cut from the same cloth.  When David was attempting to break the world record for the longest treadmill run, we made Addict2Athlete t-shirts with his photo on them.

The shirt had a silhouette of David running with a Superman cape flowing behind him.  He indeed was an example of holistic recovery and unwavering dedication.  As years went on, David and I had many conversations about Veganism and Buddhism.  David was a wealth of knowledge but was always careful to say: “That’s just my opinion.”  Regardless, his words touched my soul.  I would frequently transition between being a vegan and following a paleo diet.  Every time I called him for plant-based diet pointers he would say: “Well, well, the prodigal son returns.”  Of course with a laugh and he never stopped helping.

I am a four-time Ironman, but after my fourth Ironman, I started to struggle with anxiety.  I dropped out of several races including a half and full ironman.  After a year of rest, I signed up for my fifth Ironman to honor a few friends who had passed on.  Finishing the race meant the world to me.  The night before, I was stuck with terrible anxiety and spent most of the night crying and scared.  I was going to drop out.   But just then, I was scrolling through Facebook and saw a post from David.  I was filled with envy of his fearlessness.  I reached out to him in the middle of the night asking him about anxiety.  He responded in typical calming David fashion, and told me: “I do have anxiety.  I enjoy all of it.  I try not to win internal arguments; be in the moment you’ll be fine.” I took his advice and finished the race.         

David has spoken at several Addict2Athlete events, and when I tried to help him sell books his goal was always to get books to the people who needed them rather than those who could afford them.  A hand-full of us started the active recovery movement.  Like the others, I have a vast amount of people who look to me for guidance, or at least experience strength and hope.  I am incredibly grateful to have had David to lean on. In retrospect, I now see that it seems like David was holding all of us up.  In one of the last conversations I had with David we discussed Buddhism, leadership, and recovery.  The last message David sent to me regarding recovery and leadership was: “The path is authentic communication with self through meditation and action.”  David, although I didn’t get to see you often, I already miss you.  Your teachings will live on through everyone you touched.  You truly were Superman!    

Rob Archuleta 
Co-Founder of Addict2Athlete

Rob’s words tell the story about the type of person David Clark was. I’m sure if you asked other endurance athletes and folks in recovery, you would hear a similar story of a time where David took a moment out of his life to be there to help lift others.  He always expressed the desire to do more, to help more, to carry the message of hope to even more people. 

Now we have a chance to do more for him in his memory. Please give what you can to support Davids’ family in this heartbreaking time. If David was the one here asking to help support another person in the recovery/endurance/athlete community, I’m sure he would be running 150 miles across the Mojave Desert trying to raise $20,000.00.   He would do anything to help support the family of someone he barely knew because he felt in his heart it was the right thing to do. Please, give what you can to help his family through this difficult time. 

The sober active movement certainly has lost one of our heroes.  I will miss your smile, laughter and big hugs.   But most of all, your beautiful spirit and eternal optimism.  Rest peacefully David Clark.  We will feel your energy in the moments of the marathon of life and recovery, where we all need to find the courage and strength to endure. “We Are Superman!” 

Scott Strode

National Executive Director & Founder

The Phoenix

******************

To donate to the family of Superman a/k/a David Clark, click here:: https://www.gofundme.com/f/in-memory-of-david-clark?utm_source=customer&utm_medium=copy_link-tip&utm_campaign=p_cp+share-sheet

Jenni Lynn: Two Years Sober and Teaching People How to S’Wet…..

Jenni Lynn Patterson-LaCour just celebrated two years sober!!!!! Congrats Jenni!!!! She’s also an AEA Aquatic Training Specialist, NSCA Certified Personal Trainer and continuing education provider for AEA, AFAA and NASM. She also just celebrated two years of sobriety. Congratulations Jenni. Jenni has been working one on one with clients, as well as teaching aquatic fitness classes in New York City for over a decade. She has been presenting Nationally for the past 5 years and will be presenting in Australia, hopefully, this coming October. She is the owner/creator of S’WET by Jenni Lynn Fitness, which is her branded Aquatic class that incorporates kickboxing, H.I.I.T., Synchronized swimming, Pilates, and strength training into the pool. Jenni truly believes the perception of aquatic fitness can be transformed and soon ALL ages and genders will be working out together in the pool! Here’s how you can learn more about Jenni or contact her: Website: www.JenniLynnFitness.com Facebook: S’WET by Jenni Lynn Fitness Instagram: @JenniLynnFitness Twitter: #SWETNYC Email: JenniLynn@JenniLynnFitness.com

The Bar Bell Saves Project: Rob Best Brings the Sober Active Movement to Phoenix…

Rob Best is the founder of the Barbell Saves Project, a drug and alcohol recovery organization that provides fitness for addicts in Phoenix, Arizona.  I had the opportunity to talk with Rob about all the exciting sober active recovery happening in Phoenix.  Rob has been sober from meth, alcohol and other mind-altering substances for seven years. After falling into a black hole, he credits fitness and recovery with saving his life and he wanted to extend that to other addicts. The Barbell Saves Project offers free fitness classes to all skill levels. The goal is healing the body to save the mind.

You can reach Rob and The Barbell Saves on almost every social media platform: Instagram:  @thebarbellsaves, @robbest8180 Facebook:  www.facebook.com/thebarbellsavesproject Email:         rob.best@thebarbellsavesproject.com Website:     thebarbellsavesproject.org/

For more information on Spiritual Adenaline, visit www.spiritualadrenaline.com

#sober #soberlife #aa #na #hope #spiritualadrenaline #activesobermovement #centralrecoverypress #thebarbellsaves @thebarbellsaves @robbest8180

Scott Richardson: From 400lbs to Ultra Marathons – Tools to Achieve Sobriety & Health…

Meet Scott Richardson!! In this interview, Scott share’s about how he got sober, gained lots of weight until he hit 400lbs and then finally, retook control of his physical health through exercise and nutrition. Scott is now truly sober, healthy and happy!!! . Scott’s 68 years-old and with 31 1/2 years sober, he’s a USA Triathlon coach, a USA Masters swim coach, two-time Iron-Man, ultra-distance runner and completed a 50-mile race in October of 2019. He is currently training for a 100-mile race in October 2020 and studying for certification as a National Academy of Sports Medicine (“NASM”) personal trainer. .. . Scott explains the tools he used to get where he in our interview! He helps others through “New Freedom Fitness”, a coaching agency he has started… . You can contact Scott through this Facebook page: @Scott Richardson. For more information on Spiritual Adrenaline, visit www.spiritualadrenaline.com. . #aa#na#hope#sober#soberlife#hope#spiritualadrenaline#centralrecoverypress#centralrecoverypress @ Normal, Illinois

Exercise, Nutrition & Self-Care as Coping Mechanisms During Crisis….

            Life has certainly gotten more complicated for all of us over the last few weeks as the full impact of the Corona Virus becomes clear.  For those in addiction recovery, short or long-term, the impact has resonated in ways that rock the spiritual foundation for many addicts and alcoholics.  Well-accepted pillars of addiction recovery, including reducing isolation, getting to twelve step meetings and engaging in fellowship with others, are no longer recommended for a simple reason:  they are no longer safe.   For most of our country and the world, getting out and actively engaging in twelve step meetings or fellowship would likely result in violating shelter-in-place orders.   The sudden need to not only accept what you cannot change but embrace it right now at risk of death, presents an unprecedented challenge. 

Liquor Stores and Marijuana Dispensaries are Essential Businesses

At the same time, while most businesses are closed, in New York State and many others, liquor stores remain open as they have been designated as “essential”.  Patrons can call in orders to bars and have their favorite cocktails delivered.  In Colorado and other states where marijuana is legal, non-medicinal marijuana dispensaries also remain open and have been declared “essential.”  According to the market research firm Nielsen for the week ending March 22, 2020, hard liquor sales were up 75%, wine sales up 66% and beer up 42%.   Online liquor sales were also up 243%.  Sales are up at marijuana dispensaries and in the pornography industry.  In a country where so many cope with crisis by numbing themselves with addictive substances or behaviors, those seeking to maintain their sobriety seem even more isolated and alone.  A.A., N.A. and other major recovery communities have moved meetings and other types of support online.   There are twelve step meetings offered via zoom and other platforms almost 24/7.  However, online meetings and other traditional recovery modalities do not necessarily support the physical health.  That’s where using this time of shelter-in-place to develop a self-care lifestyle can benefit you in the short and long-term.  

Cranford, NJ, USA March 28, 2020 A sign in a park in Cranford, New Jersey reminds walkers and bikers on the trail to keep their social distance

Self-Care, Your Sobriety and the Pandemic

Studies show that those who integrate a self-care lifestyle, including exercise and nutrition, into their recovery, have much higher rates of success.  Exercise can prompt the brain to regenerate dopamine receptors, reduce cravings for alcohol and drug, prompt the body to produce “feel good” hormones like endorphins[i].   The reason, exercise stimulatea the dopaminergic reward pathway and contribute to a reduction in levels of stress, anxiety and depression, all of which are prevalent in people who identify as being in recovery[ii].  In fact, some researchers have identified a correlation between exercise-related activity and the ability to cope with stress and anxiety in order to stay sober[iii].  The positive outcomes increase exponentially for those who also integrate healthy eating[iv].   It turns out your Mother was right all along: “you are what you eat” and “move a muscle, change a thought”.   Advice for those in recovery regarding exercise routines and healthy nutrition, specific to the addiction recovery, is not so easy to come by.   Here are some recommendations, all evidence-based, that folks in recovery can try during the shelter-in-place.  Time at home over the next couple of weeks or months can be used for one of two purposes.   To reinforce negative behaviors that will drag you back to addiction or develop positive new habits that affirm the desire to maintain your sobriety, even in these most challenging circumstances.    

Exercise Recommendations:

            Although shelter-in-place and social distancing have changed how and when you can exercise, some good old-fashioned ways have resurfaced.  Walking, probably the most under-appreciated form of workout, is becoming very popular.   Put on your mask and gloves and walk around the block, to the store or go to a park.   You can even invite someone to join you:  I call that “green fellowship.”  Even five minutes a day or regular waking has been shown to improve self-esteem and mood!  Studies show outdoor workouts increase the benefits you receive compared to indoor workouts[v].  Almost every day I take a walk or a bike ride through a park or along a river or lake.   Just like I never feel worse after attending a twelve step meeting, I’ve always feel better when I get home from my morning workout!   If you can develop the habit of walking in the morning, it will help put you in a positive mind-set all day long.   Take advantage  of green spaces, fresh air and lack of crowds during the shelter-in-place and you might just get “addicted” to this positive habit[vi].

Nutritional Recommendations:

            Bill W., one of the founders of Alcoholics Anonymous, created a list of the “go to’ foods for alcoholics which undercut their sobriety.  He referred to these foods as “The sister foods” to alcohol.  They are French fries, potatoes, white rice, pasta, soda and refined sugar.  The reason you want to avoid these foods is they are all calorie rich, but nutrient deficient, just like alcohol.   They prompt your body to overproduce dopamine and other feel good hormones in an unsustainable way.  This creates fluctuations in blood sugar and mood, just like alcohol and other substances did in active addiction.   Here’s my recommendations for healthier alternatives:  instead of french fries, sweet potato fries; instead of potatoes, yams or sweet potatoes, instead of white rice, whole grain or brown rice; instead of a starchy pasta, try a vegetable-based pasta, instead of refined sugar, honey; instead of soda with refined sugar, tonic or seltzer with fresh fruit to add flavor These are simple dietary changes that can lead to profound changes in your body, mind and spirit during shelter-at-home and beyond.   

Spiritual Recommendations:

            In our society, which requires almost everyone to multi-task and juggle many responsibilities simultaneously, shelter-at-home is a chance to breathe.  If you can frame this opportunity to be home with family or just yourself as a positive one, you can appreciate the opportunity to reflect on your life and sobriety.  In the context of nutrition, exercise and your recovery, the chance to reflect and journal is an opportunity that may not come again once things return to “normal.”   It’s an opportunity to make conscious contact with your body, by integrating the Twelve Steps into what you eat and how much you exercise.   Journaling will be even more impactful if you have applied the specific nutrition and exercise recommendations referenced earlier in this article.  

Conduct a Fourth or Tenth Step inventory on how what you eat and the amount you exercise impact your health and sobriety.   Here are some suggested questions:  How does what I eat make me feel?   Do I tend to eat emotionally and why?   Do I tend to eat late at night, if so, why?  Do I eat many of the sister foods to alcohol?  If so, how can I modify what I am eating?  Do I eat to numb emotions or avoid dealing with them?  Do I eat at my problems?  If so, how can I better handle these emotions or problems?  

Now apply the Tenth Step to exercise or the lack of exercise in your life.   Does my lack of movement impact how I feel?   How has my lack of exercise impacted my health?  How has lack of exercise impacted my sobriety?    How can I better integrate exercise into my daily life?    If you have gone out for walks as I recommended, try these questions:  How do I feel after I go for a walk, better or worse?   What did I enjoy most about going to the park today?   What type of exercise can I commit to when I go back to work?  Where can I work in exercise in my daily routine (use stairs rather than elevator)?  

Conclusion:

            Don’t make the mistake so many Americans are making by choosing to numb yourself with alcohol, drugs, food, sex or other addictive behaviors during the next couple of weeks or months.  Use shelter-at-home and social distancing as valuable “me” time to reflect on your relationship with food, exercise and your spiritual life.   Keep an open mind and try these simple recommendations that can transform not only your sobriety but allow you to make conscious contact with your body, improve your physical health help foster a more positive outlook on life.     For lots of ideas that can benefit you during these difficult days, visit www.spiritualadrenaline.com.  

About the author:

Tom Shanahan is a civil rights attorney who lives in New York.  He is also a personal trainer and certified in sports nutrition.   He is the Author of Spiritual Adrenaline: Strengthen & Nourish Your Recovery, published by Central Recovery Press.  Spiritual Adrenaline teaches people in recovery how to integrate exercise and nutrition into their twelve step practice.  


[i] C.L. Robertson, et al., “Effect of Exercise Training on Striatal Dopamine D2/D3 Receptors in Methamphetamine Users during Behavioral Treatment,” Neuropsychopharamacology 41 (2016): 1629-36.

[ii] A.H. Taylor, et al., “Acute effect of exercise on alcohol urges and attentional bias towards alcohol related images in high alcohol consumers,” Mental Health and Physical Activity, 6, no. 3 (2013), 220-26. 

[iii] S. Strode, et al., “impact of aerobic exercise training on cognitive functions and effect, associated to the COMT polymorphism in young adults,” Nuerobiology of Learning and Memory 94, no. 3, (2010): 364-72, cited by K. Blum, S. Teitelbaum, M. Oscar, Molecular Neurobiology of Addiction Recovery: The 12 Steps Program and Fellowship (New York Springer Publications, 2013): 26.

[iv] J.L. Medina, et al., “Exercise-related activities are associated with positive outcome in contingency management treatments for substance abuse disorders,” Addictive Behaviors 33 (2008): 1072-75.       

[v] J.O. Barron and J. Pretty, “What is the Best Dose of Nature and Green Exercise for Improving Mental Health? A Multi-Study Analysis,” Environmental Science and Technology, 44 (2010);: 3947-55.

[vi] J. Thompson Coon, “Does Participating in Physical Activity in Outdoor Natural Environments Have a Greater Effect on Physical and Mental Wellbeing than Physical Activity Indoors? A Systematic Review,” Environmental Science and Technology, 45 (2011): 1761-72.

Joe Cannon: Nutrition & Supplements in the Age of the Corona Virus…

Joe Cannon is a nationally recognized expert in sports nutrition and supplement benefits/safety.  He has an MS in exercise science and a BS in chemistry and biology.   He’s the author of six books including Nutrition Essentials: A Guidebook for Fitness Professionals.  He teaches Sports Nutrition and certifies personal trainers for the AAAI/ISMA and is a sought-after speaker on the role of nutrition and supplements and health.   He’s so smart, he’s even been retained to lecture at NASA.  Yes, NASA!  Joe is among the foremost experts in supplement safety and regularly reviews scientific research and shares his opinions at www.supplementclarity.com. 

I had the chance to interview Joe about the importance of nutrition to good health and a strong immune system.  He also shared about what to avoid or be cautious about given so many scammers are making promises about supplements and the Corona Virus..

You’ll learn a lot in the short interview.    For more information, visit www.joe-cannon.com and www.supplementclarity.com.  You can also follow Joe on Instagram at @joecannonms.

For more information on Spiritual Adrenaline, visit www.spiritualadrenaline.com.

.

#aa #na #hope #sober #soberlife #hope #spiritualadrenaline #centralrecoverypress #centralrecoverypress #aaai/ismafamily

Sustainable Resolutions Guide – Start, and Maintain a Sober Year.

SUSTAINABLE RESOLUTIONS

FOR PEOPLE IN RECOVERY

According to Forbes Magazine, just 8% of people who make a resolution keep it.  Most, break their resolutions in the first two weeks of the New Year. Here is a list of the most popular resolutions for last year:

  • Lose weight
  • Get organized
  • Spend less, save more
  • Enjoy life to the fullest
  • Stay fit and healthy
  • Learn something exciting
  • Quit smoking
  • Help others achieve their dreams
  • Fall in love
  • Spend more time with family

Although these resolutions are based upon people in the general population, it is likely that many people in recovery share these goals.

So Why Do So Many People Fail?

The problem with these resolutions is they go to the end game without a strategy to get there.   In other words you really need to have a plan, both short-term and long-term, to lose weight and keep it off, quit smoking or stay fit and healthy.   Rather than have such broad and sweeping resolutions, what worked for me, and I think may work for you, is to have the long-term goal in mind, but break it down into manageable subgroups, and really focus on making progress, baby-step by baby-step.  By focusing on the micro-level and succeeding, we are better able to gain the self-confidence necessary to ultimately achieve our desired end result.  No coach goes into a game without a strategy and, given that your quality of life is at stake here, neither should you.

Recovery-Based Resolutions

The list of last year’s top ten resolutions involve a lot of issues we address at Spiritual Adrenaline: lose weight; stay fit and healthy; quit smoking; etc.  Rather than incredibly broad resolutions, I recommend breaking down your resolution into smaller, more realistic goals and doing everything possible to achieve this realistic resolution.  Once you achieve it, you can set another and keep going.

For example, if you are looking to quit smoking you need to develop a plan to address “triggers” that lead you to smoke.  For me, that was coming and going from buildings.  When I was about to enter or leave a building, I would chew a nicotine lozenge to avoid lighting up.   Once I broke the habit of smoking coming and going from buildings, then I addressed not smoking in my car, etc.   It was the smaller victories along the way that ultimately enabled me to quit smoking.   It all starts somewhere and the smaller victories along the way build the self-confidence needed to ultimately win the war.

In the movie “What About Bob,” Bill Murray repeated the mantra “baby steps” over and over.   In early recovery, I adopted that mantra for most things.  It was incredibly important for me to stop self-defeating and self-sabotage and instead focus on getting out of my own way and being my own best friend.

Here are some achievable resolutions that will enhance your recovery and can start you down the road toward major change.  I picked one for each of the major areas we focus on here at Spiritual Adrenaline.

Recovery Nutrition:

Replace processed sugar and sweeteners with a natural sweetener:   Diabetes and hyperglycemia are a major issue for people in recovery.  The percentage of people in recovery with these conditions is well above the general population; according to some studies, as high as 93%.  These conditions often make it much more challenging to stay sober as fluctuation in blood sugar levels dramatically alters mood and energy levels.  Moreover, many people in recovery, especially alcoholics, have compromised liver function.   If this applies to you, your liver may not be able to break down high-fructose corn syrup and other processed sweeteners.   High-fructose corn syrup is quite common, and often the main sweetener in candy, ice cream and many other products.   Over time, high-fructose corn syrup builds up in the liver causing a whole set of other health-related problems.   By replacing processed sweeteners with natural sweeteners, you take a major step forward in diet modification and a healthier you.

Recovery Exercise:

Walk At Least A Mile A Day:  Move a muscle, change a thought.  It is undisputed that cardiovascular exercise will help burn calories, help lower cholesterol levels, lower blood pressure and enhance production of brain chemicals and hormones that lift your mood.   A mile a day is not a long distance at all, and this resolution should be an easy lift for most folks.   It can also be the first step towards incorporating exercise into your daily routine, which is a must if we seek to enhance our changes of long-term success in recovery.   Once you get comfortable with the mile, you can always go a little further, and then a little further.  However, we all must start somewhere.

You can measure your mile the old-fashioned way, by actually measuring the length to and from certain locations or by driving the route ahead of time.  There are countless gadgets and apps that will do it for you.   So there is no reason not to give it a try.  For folks in recovery, this is a great time to meditate, go over a gratitude list in their head, call a loved one or just enjoy nature.  If you tend to isolate yourself and have a history of doing so while you were using, invite someone to join you.  Maybe you can walk to and from a meeting together.

For people trying to quit smoking, cardiovascular activity is of great importance.  Most people who smoke tend to engage in limited activity.  The longer you smoke, the less you tend to move, as even minimal movement can be challenging for a smoker, especially those with lung diseases or other smoking-related health issues.   When you engage in cardio, you force your lungs to work.   By doing this, you can feel the impact of smoking on your lungs and their ability to provide you with oxygen.    I can tell you this first hand because this was true for me.  After heavy cardio, I would have great difficulty breathing and my lungs hurt.  It convinced me that it was a behavior that could not continue. By incorporating exercise and proper nutrition into your lifestyle along with like-minded people (i.e., non-smokers), smoking becomes less and less acceptable and appealing.

Smoking Cessation:

Inventory The Times You Smoke and Make At Least One Change To Your Routine:  Sit down and figure out the times of day you smoke, and commit to erasing at least one. When I smoked, I was lighting up when I went in and out of buildings, hanging around the front of twelve-step meetings with the smoking crowd, in my car when I was driving, and in my apartment at night.  When I committed to stop, I changed the ways I went to and from work to avoid places where smokers congregated and where I traditionally lit up a cigarette. I changed my meetings, went later and/or left early to avoid smokers, pulled over as opposed to permitting myself to smoke in my car, and left my cigarettes in the mailbox at night so I did not have them available to smoke in my apartment.

Breaking these types of habits and routines in the context of smoking is huge.  The habits are what perpetuate the addiction.  By changing them, you change the neurological associations and cravings in your brain, and take a huge leap towards kicking the habit.    It all starts by inventorying your smoking and developing a battle plan.   One victory and change in the routine will give you the confidence to keep going and not give up.

Recovery Vitamins, Minerals and Hormones:

Eat Something Green Every Day:  It sounds so simple but you would be surprised how many people do not eat green vegetables on a daily basis.  Green leafy veggies are our best friends for so many reasons.  First, they are not carb-heavy vegetables, so if we are looking to lean down, they enhance that goal.  Second, they do not contain substances that convert to sugar or glucose in the digestion process.  This is incredibly important given the disproportionate number of people in recovery with diabetes and hyperglycemia.   Third, leafy green vegetables pack the most nutrients per calorie than any other food group.   Greens contain significant amounts of Vitamins A, C, E, K and several of the B vitamins.  In addition, they are rich in calcium, magnesium, iron and potassium.     As people in recovery, our bodies are often used to calorie-rich, nutrient-deficient foods, chief among them candy and alcohol.   The benefits of eating something green everyday will pay off exponentially as you will be restoring the building blocks necessary to meet your body’s needs and proper brain chemistry.

If you eat some greens every day, you won’t have to worry about the recommended servings per week, as you’ll easily exceed them.  In case you were wondering, the USDA recommends three servings of leafy greens each week.

Recovery Spirituality:

This is a tough category because the issue of “spirituality” is so subjective. So in this category I will give you three suggestions:

Establish A Morning Self-Care Practice:  How we start the day sets the tone for the rest of the day.  A morning self-care practice establishes you and your recovery as the priority and the absolute first thing that gets your attention in the morning.   This need not be a lengthy, highly formal practice.  Set aside 5 minutes every morning to reflect on gratitude, your goals for the day, or whatever else you would like to focus on.  Use this time to reflect inward, towards your soul, and be driven by your needs.  Not the needs of others, clients, significant others, family or any other person, place or thing.   Enjoy your 5 minutes of solitude and stay in gratitude.  A person who stays in gratitude will not drink or use drugs.

Journal About Your Feelings:  Feelings are not facts and putting them down in black and white is an incredibly powerful experience in many ways.  Oftentimes, when I write down how I am feeling, it makes it unmistakably clear that what is happening in my head is absolutely ridiculous.  By writing down my feelings or, as I sometimes refer to them – the “chaos in my head,” I gain perspective. Journaling also grounds me in reality, makes me think about how my brain processes people, places and things, and makes it easier to share with a sponsor or friend at a later time.   A journal need not be War and Peace, but rather a few sentences, at the beginning, during or end of the day.

Reach Out to Someone and Just Say Thanks or Hello:  Once a week, biweekly or monthly, chose someone who is important in your life, someone you have not connected with for a while, and say thanks or hello.   Let them know how and why they impacted your life and that you care about them.  These types of random acts of kindness will lift your spirit as well as that of the person to whom you are reaching out.   We are all so busy these days that often the only time we communicate with people we care about is when some terrible event happens, such as an unexpected death.  Have no regrets, seize the day and reach out and say thanks.

Pick up a copy of Spiritual Adrenaline for More Resolution Ideas!!!

If you are looking for lots of ideas on how you can supercharge your recovery in 2020, pick up a copy of my book, Spiritual Adrenaline: A Lifestyle Plan to Strengthen & Nourish Your Recovery.  It’s full of helpful tools you can integrate into your lifestyle right away to achieve your dreams.  

We wish you and your loved ones a happy, healthy and sober 2020.  We would love your feedback on this and other blog posts.     We hope you’ll remain an active part of the Spiritual Adrenaline community in 2020!!!!!