Gratitude Trip: Grand Canyon – Day Four, the Final Ascent…

Indian Garden to South Rim

Twilight at Indian Garden

We woke at 3:30 a.m. on the final day of our hike with the goal of getting started by 4:30 a.m., to beat the sun and allow some hikers who were having trouble more time to ascend.  I packed up my tent and camp for the final time and was excited to embrace the challenge this day would bring.   I said my final goodbye to Indian Garden and The Plateau and silently thanked this place for hosting me for the previous night. I recognized the privilege I had been given as I embarked on the last major portion of the hike.  I decided to break with my group for the day and challenge myself to ascend as fast as possible.   I still have a heavy load of about fifty-pounds in my backpack.  However, I want to see just how hard I could push my heart and lungs and what they are capable of.   

The final ascent was harder than I anticipated.  I had seen many-out-of-shape day hikers come down into Indian Garden and then head back up and thought to myself if they can do, it must be a piece of cake.  However, I hadn’t realized I saw them after they came down, not after they went back up. The ascent is a consistent incline and continues all the way up.  I pushed myself and continued to motor up.  As we started out so early, I did not pass any other hikers who were on their way up.  I also didn’t pass many hikers who were on their way down until I was almost all the way to the South Rim.   I felt amazing!  My body was still able to perform after four days to rigorous activity.  I could feel my heart pounding. I thought to myself how blessed I am to have a heart capable of such physical activity at the ripe old age of 51.   My lungs never failed me and I kept breathing deep, in an out, without any wheezing like eight years ago.  I kept thinking to myself how miraculous the body truly is and how it can heal itself with self-care and time.   

View down into Canyon from Bright Angel Trail near South Rim.

This got me going on a full-body mediation.  I started with my toes and made my way all the way to my head.  As I hiked up the switchbacks, I tried to pay close attention to how each body-part felt, the work each was doing to help me ascend and to identify the other parts of my body that were working together to make all of this possible. For example, I really focused on my how my calf, quadriceps and hamstring muscles all worked together to permit me to lift my feet.  The more attention I paid, the more I realized that each-and-every-step is a miracle.  How each and every breath is in-and-of-itself a miracle. I was sofocused on how my body was functioning one step at a time, one breath at a time, that when I looked up, I was almost at the South Rim.   Hours had seemingly turned into minutes and I was very close to my goal.  Just as I was about to reach the South Rim, a young man who I gotten to know over the last couple of days of passed me and said: “Ha, ha, I’m going to beat you up!”  I was so impressed by the fact that he beat me, I bought him breakfast.  Turns out, he is also in recovery.  His drug of choice was crystal meth and he has been sober for two years.   I then met his Dad, sister and nephew who were hiking with him.   His Dad had twenty-years in recovery from alcohol.  I thought to myself, what a small world.  I also thought to myself, miracles are all around us if we chose to recognize them.  I have seen so many miracles over the last eight-years and know that by continuing to live the Spiritual Adrenaline lifestyle, I will be blessed to see many, many more.  

My Final Gratitude List and Reflections

As we drove back to Flagstaff, my brain was overwhelmed by the sensory overload that is the Grand Canyon. It’s a lot to take in and I think it will take me a long-time to truly digest all of what I experienced over the last four days.  I am grateful for being in the natural splendor of the Canyon, which reaffirmed my belief in a higher power.   I am grateful for the people I met in the Canyon and shared the journey with.  I met a father and son who were hiking together and enjoying an experience that neither would ever forget.  I could sense their love for one another and that each recognized the opportunity to share this experience together as something incredibly special.  I’d have given anything to have the same experience with my Dad, who passed away fifteen-years ago.  In a way, watching the two of them allowed me to imagine what it would have been like for me to have been able to do this with my Dad. This was a very special and unexpected gift.

Tom at South Rim after four-day hike.

I watched members of my small group struggle to get through each of the days but never quit.  I watched as things got tougher and we all supported one another.  What became important was not that Imake it to the South Rim, but that we, collectively as a group, make it to the South Rim. The power is in the collective, rather than individual experience.  I am grateful to have had the opportunity to have been of service on two days, and carried the backpack for another hiker who was struggling.  I am grateful to have met other members of the recovery community along the trail.  This reinforced my belief in the power of combining exercise and nutrition, a/k/aself-care, into an addiction recovery program. Also, the power of being in nature and way from the concrete and crowds of the big city.  Lastly, I am grateful to no longer have my life confined to a small and unhealthy comfort zone.  I’m grateful that I now recognize that life truly begins outside of my existing comfort zone.  

People, places and things matter. I am grateful for all of the people, places and things, I experienced over the last four days!  

Tom Shanahan is the author of Spiritual Adrenaline: A Lifestyle Plan to Strengthen & Nourish Your Recovery, published by Central Recovery Press in January 2019. You can purchase Spiritual Adrenaline on Amazon or at Barnes & Noble. For more information, visit www.spiritualadrenaline.com.

Ignite Recovery: Wisconsin & The Sober Active Movement!

Ignite Recovery, based in Wisconsin, is the latest sober active group that has successfully integrated a healthy lifestyle into an overall addiction recovery program.   I interviewed the founders to find out how Ignite came to be and to learn about Ignite’s mission.   Here’s my interview with the founders of Ignite.  

A group shot of members of Ignite-Recovery in Wisconsin.

What are your short-term goals and long-term goals for Ignite?

Our short-term goals are to increase the capacity and membership of our sober active lifestyle community.  We are also involved in community outreach to reduce the stigma around addiction and recovery.  We are accomplishing these short-term goals by increasing our class offerings and expanding Ignites’ reach. This has been a grassroots recovery movement and we have been building partnerships throughout southeast Wisconsin. Through these partnerships, we have been able to find new locations to offer our classes.  

Our long-term goal is to start planting recovery outreach centers through Wisconsin. Our plan is to start small, but we are striving to create the Ignite model for these recovery outreach centers.       Our dream would be to have space with a warehouse-style gym, yoga studio and cafe that serves healthy foods. We want to create a space where people can connect with one another and grow in physical, mental, and spiritual wellness. 

The inclusion of Mixed Martial Arts (“MMA”) is unique.   I am not aware of any other similar type program here in the United States!  How does MMA fit into an overall recovery program?  People think of yoga and meditation when they think of recovery but not MMA.  So, let’s enlighten them to the benefits since what you are doing is unique. 

All of our offerings are about serving, mobilizing, and empowering the local recovery community.  When we launch a class or group it is really about what the local community wants to do.  Offering MMA classes came about because a person in recovery reached out to me about being of service.  He is certified as a personal trainer, he trains people in jiu-jitsu, boxing, kickboxing, etc. and he wanted to give back to people in recovery.  For Ignite, it is really about us being able to empower himto help others.  When we talked more, MMA is about self-discipline, embracing pain, and becoming a better, stronger person.  Before we launched the first MMA class, “Fight for Recovery”, we started asking our community what they thought and if people would be interested in attending. The overwhelming response was yes!

For us, Ignite Recovery is about creating opportunities for people to connect and find their tribe. Nobody is pressured to do anything they do not want to do.  If you want to do MMA – do that, if you want to do yoga – do that, if you want to train for triathlons – do that.  As long as it is about creating community and growing in recovery together, we will probably support it.   

Shari is the mother of someone in recovery.  I asked her how a sober active community can benefit the families of people in addiction recovery?

For almost 4 years I’ve been co-facilitating a family support group for those with loved ones who are either in active substance use or in recovery. My sole credentials for first working with families was that of being a mom of a person in recovery.

Aerial yoga and Sharon, one of its founders.

Ignite embraces both harm reduction and the ideology of the evidence-based CRAFT (Community Reinforcement and Family Therapy) approach. There are three things at the core of this: First, is a need to pull families out of their unhealthy entanglements with their loved ones — yes, we get too close and try to micromanage everything.  Second, we share with them some of the best strategies for moving their loved ones toward treatment (no, you can’t force them to do anything). And third, we teach them some of the best ways to support a family member in recovery (lean in when you can, step back when you have to). So, those who embrace CRAFT, also embrace the idea that there is value to understanding as much as they can about their loved one’s condition.  For many families, these basic concepts are game-changers and Ignite plays a part at in each.

Having a sober active community is the first line of defense when your loved one is using, and you need self-care. Take a yoga class. Go on a Sunday morning hike with people who are journeying toward recovery (and see what possibilities are out there).   We also provide a valuable resource.  Family members can sit in an open meeting after a class. Listen and learn from the experience of others   Finally Ignite is a useful tool for reconnecting with a family member once they’re on their recovery path.  For example, at one of the Ignite classes, I met a mother and daughter who were doing just that. They were taking one a yoga class together because they had been looking for a place where they could just “be” together.  Ignite provides a neutral space where people can be safe just being themselves.

Given the reality of so many student athletes getting hooked on opiates for sports-related injuries, I wanted to know how Ignite could benefit this growing demographic within the addiction recovery community.

Members of Ingite after a CrossFit workout.

The benefit is enormous.  Many young people struggle to connect with the treatment world, particularly with AA. While all of us at Ignite are huge proponents of the program (for family members, of course, t’s the community of Al-Anon), we know that many struggle with the feeling that AA was the only community for addicts. So, if you’re not sitting in a church basement somewhere talking about your issues, you’re not healing. Often, a person is scared or uncomfortable to open up in a small room filled with chairs in a circle. It’s difficult to develop relationships, true relationships with individuals that way.  For an athlete, it’s easier to work out, sweat, feel pain together and at the end there is this connection over something common you did together.  And, after a few times, it grows from a “Hello”, to a “How was your weekend” to knowing intimate details about another person. It’s funny, because it’s almost like dating. There is a fear of opening up at times, specifically in the meeting rooms. But once you do, it changes your life.  And if that connection you made at Ignite reaches out and goes to a meeting, that person may feel stronger to open up because they have support with them.  There’s a lot of healing that can be done in experiential communities — a lot of bonding that can happen while hiking, climbing, working out at the gym. 

Adam lived in a sober house for a period of time and that experience helped him stay sober.  I asked Adam about how he benefited from that experience and how others could as well. 


Adam and his family



When I first found recovery, I was a mess.  Living in a sober house help me learn how to live life again.  I got connected to 12-step recovery groups and I launched myself on a path spiritual progress.  Being active was also a big part of that early journey that has continued for the past now 8 plus years.  I began going to the gym with another guy in the sober living and working out became a consistent part of my life.  I also got connected with a recovery softball team (where I met Tim), got back into rock climbing, and started playing beach volleyball.  It was really about doing all the activities I loved to do, and the disease of addiction had gotten in the way of.  Working the steps, sponsoring guys, and being active has always been a huge part of my recovery.  I was always trying to grow and be a better person.  I am also pretty competitive, so I spent a few years training for beach volleyball and competing in tournaments.  The importance that being active has had on my journey and my physical, mental, and spiritual growth is what led us to launch Ignite Recovery and create an inclusive active lifestyle community.  We just know how important fitness has been to us and we want to help others find fitness in recovery.

Ben has shared publicly in the past about how his addiction to pain-killers began at the dentist.  I asked him what advice he has for others about pain killers for dental visits or other routine medical procedures? 

I work in the medical field as a Veterinarian and have many friends on the human medical side as well. The government is doing a great job at restricting the access of prescription pain medications. Most practitioners are starting to avoid opioids as a first line of defense for pain management and opting for other, non-addictive substances.  But, more than likely, there will be a time in almost every child’s life when they will be prescribed opioids.  And rather than blindly doling them out without fear of consequence, parents should educate themselves as much as possible. The same care they give to what their children eat, and what they watch on TV really needs to be given to what medications they allow them to have — even more so.  They will need to research addiction and understand its causes and causalities.  

The first Vicodin (Hydrocodone) I ever took was prescribed for my wisdom teeth.  I remember it vividly:  Sitting in a living room chair, staring at the wall, thinking this was the greatest thing ever.  But, as stated earlier, education is key.  Because of this experience I definitely had a genetic component in me that would have reared its ugly head at any time.  The next thing to consider is that while my prescription was only for 5 days, I had easy access other opiates. The problem arose when I realized my mother (who had a significant medical condition and has had many operations), had a cabinet full of Vicodin (hydrocodone) that she never finished.  I had direct access to something that my parents never in their wildest dreams ever thought was a problem. It was not locked up, not thought about, or ever checked on. I stole that medication for months with no one being the wiser.  Herein lies the larger issue.  Potentially, if these unused prescriptions were disposed of correctly, or accounted for in a lock box or safe box, itmayhave slowed my progression.  But as an addict, I would have found a way.  I would have bought them or lied in the locker room to get them.

Most parents think, “never with my child” and I had a white collar, privileged upbringing.  That is how my parents thought.  But addiction doesn’t care about income, race, sexuality or any defining factors you can think of.  Its all-encompassing and can affect anyone.  So, if there are controlled substances in the house.  Lock them up.  Keep track of them! Do not put them under the bathroom sink and forget about them. 

I asked Tim about how got started and why CrossFit has become an important part of his program personally and at Ignite….  Here is what he had to say.   

A.J., a member of Ignite getting his pump on

A good friend who I met through a co-ed recovery softball league came to me with an idea about a community non-profit that was based around fitness.  He showed me what The Phoenix (then known as Phoenix Multisport) was doing and how it was centered around CrossFit.  I thought that idea was great! I have my CF-L1 and I also coach classes at CrossFit Waukesha which is where Ignite holds its functional fitness classes right now. I’ve been to prison twice which is where I found time to do correspondence courses through ISSA. Ultimately, I received my personal trainer certification. Almost seven years later, with a lot of work by a lot of people, we’ve launched interest meetings doing CrossFit and it has blossomed.

Why is CrossFit so popular in the addiction recovery community?   How does it benefit members of that community?

So many reasons!  In general, CrossFit is about fitness.  Our physical, mental, and spiritual health are all interwoven.  I love how CrossFit talks about fitness being beyond wellness.  Where wellness is normality, being healthy, and the absence of disease.  Fitness is having a heightened defense against disease.  When we look at our physical, mental, and spiritual wellness we actually want to be FIT.  We want physical, mental, and spiritual fitness to provide a heightened defense against the disease of addiction.  Like you would say, we want to supercharge our recovery – and CrossFit enhances our fitness. 

CrossFit naturally creates community.  Tim, Shari, and I along with some others in our community all belong to CrossFit Waukesha and the structure of classes create opportunities for people to connect.  It is not like going to some chain gym where everyone is listening to music on headphones, their face is in their phones, and they just want to work out and leave.  At CrossFit, people are talking, connecting, encouraging each other.  They connect with those who work out at their box and they notice when somebody misses a class.  CrossFit’s ability to build community and relationships is perfect for the recovery community.

CrossFit is both a physical and mental test.  Physically it’s about the sport, there is infinite room for improvement and growth.  Everything is measurable so you can really see where and how you are getting better.  Nothing feels better than a new PR – hitting a big lift or smashing an old time.  At the same time, CrossFit is just as much about the mental aspect of the sport – the sports psychology.  It’s about embracing the pain and knowing what your body can do.  So many times, it’s about a mindset.  My legs, arms, and lungs will be on fire and my mind will tell me to stop, yet when we embrace the pain and keep pushing a breakthrough is often waiting.  Nothing feels better than physically doing something your mind tells you that you can’t.  This carries over into our recovery journey.  We are going to deal with pain and things that are uncomfortable and being fit helps us overcome adversity.  

CrossFit is often referred to as “functional fitness” and many of us in the recovery aren’t just looking for something that helps us tone or look good — for many of us ‘fitness’ is about being able to function in the world and to do the work that has been given to us to do. So, the term “function” takes on a whole new meaning. It really fits us.Ultimately, CrossFit enhances our physical, mental, and spiritual fitness so we can have resilience in recovery!

To learn more about Ignite, visit their Facebook page @IgniteRecovery or their website: www.ignite-recovery.org.  

Dan T.: The Spiritual Adrenaline Challenge

Dan T. is in long-term recovery from alcohol and drug addiction.   In a couple of months he will be celebrating ten years sober.  However, his current lifestyle prevents him from optimizing his physical health.  Dan is looking to get past “the wall” he has hit and has agreed to follow the Spiritual Adrenaline program for the next six months.

One of the recommendations in my book, Spiritual Adrenaline: A Lifestyle Plan to Strengthen & Nourish Your Recovery, before embarking on a journey of change, is to write a letter to yourself about where you are at the present time, the reasons you’ve decided to embark on your journey and what realistic goals you hope to achieve.   

If like Dan, you’re looking to get past the wall holding you back, check out our blog at www.spiritualadrenalilne.com, visit our social media platforms and, pick up a copy of my book, Spiritual Adrenaline, available at Barnes & Noble and on Amazon.   

Here’s Dan’s letter to himself incorporating his reasons for embarking on the Spiritual Adrenaline program.  

Dan T. in Central Park.

*************

Dear Dan

I’m writing you this letter at the beginning of your program with Spiritual Adrenaline. As of today, you are 9 years, 5 months and 12 days sober. This is unbelievable. It has been an incredible ride and you truly have a life beyond your wildest dreams, just as they promised. But, as they also told you, you have the disease of more. And although life has gotten so good and the cash and prizes have come, in other ways you continue to give over to your addictive ways and character defects. Workaholism, fiances and food have often gotten the better of you. You are aware of this. You contemplate it. You talk to fellows about it. Like drinking and using, you’ve sworn you’ll change and that it will be different a million times over. As I sit and write this to you, I’ll remind you that over the past months, there has been a lot of acceptance that has grown up around these issues. Not a resignation that this is how it will always be, but more of an acknowledgment that in spite of these things, you have managed, with your higher power, to build a vibrant, full, and happy life. That is sobriety!! And it’s awesome!! But you are always thinking about what life would be like if you could tame these obsessions, the way you have drugs and alcohol.

In regards to this Challenge and dealing specifically with nutrition, relationship to food and exercise, this is something you think about on a daily basis. To the point of obsession at times. Even before getting sober, diet and exercise could be an obsession. But you’ll remember that a few years ago, when the workload was so intense, you gave yourself permission to eat whatever and whenever you wanted and to exercise whenever you could. It brought you comfort to fill yourself up with comforting food. You told yourself that when it was time, you would get back on track with consistent exercise and diet and lose the weight you gained. That has yet to happen. And right now, you are heavier than you’ve ever been and your exercise regimen is the most inconsistent it’s ever been. You aren’t wondering if you can change. You’ve done it before and you know you have it in you. The question is: How? And whether or not you can an adopt changes that will become a way of life, and not down the road put the weight back on in the midst of what turns out to be another 18+ month food bender. 

Dan T. is taking the Spiritual Adrenaline Challenge.

What you want from this Challenge is simple. To lose 40 pounds. To have a consistent exercise regime. To feel the fantastic feeling you feel from a clean diet. To not literally feel dirty inside from eating crap and sugar. To look great in clothes…and out of them. And, at least from time to time, feel that really great feeling when someone you find physically attractive feels the same way about you. You’ve been on both sides of the equation a few times. You’ve been the overweight one in your group that friends will occasionally make a joke or two about. And you’ve had the type of health and body that have people asking about your regime. 

As you read this, know that your 6-months-ago-self was excited to start this process. He’s known for a while that he had gone beyond the point of being able to do this by himself. He knew this was a win/win/win scenario and at the very least, he was going to learn a lot about himself. People are often telling you that you’re a bit hard on yourself. So remember in this Challenge, and in life, to take it easy…….but still take it!

With Love, 

Dan

Drop The Rock: Steps 6 & 7…

Drop The Rock is among the best-selling recovery books of all time. Concepts from the book are now taught in a seminar type setting. Cathy A. presents the Drop The Rock program in this video taped at the Gay Sober Men’s Conference in New York City in June 2018. For more information, visit http://www.gayandsober.org.

Gay Sober Men’s Conference 2018: A Message From a Co-Founder….

Cristian P. co-founded the annual Gay Sober Men’s Conference held in New York City during Pride celebrations in June. In this interview, he shares with me why and how the GSM conference came to be. For more information on GSM, go to http://www.gayandsober.org.

Spiritual Adrenaline – Part 1: Education

The education portion of my book tracks the latest peer-reviewed studies in exercise and nutrition science, with an emphasis on people in addiction recovery.  I track what nutrients can help lessen cravings, provide your body with anti-oxidants needed to remediate years of substance abuse and malnutrition, and other critical nutritional information to increase your chances of success and long-term happiness in recovery.  I also track the latest research on how different types of exercise can help address various issues common for people in recovery, for example anxiety.   By learning the basics of my evidence-based approach, you are prepared to then apply the benefits to your life and recovery and achieve your aspirations. 

Spiritual Adrenaline and Rez Hope Announce Day One North Carolina

Come join Spiritual Adrenaline and Rez Hope for Day One of the rest of our life.

Mount Everest Journal: My Trek From Lukla to Everest Base Camp – Days 9 to 13

What goes up, must come down, so after achieving our goal of reaching the Everest Base Camp, it was time for the long trek back down to Lukla and then Katmandu. Our route back tracked our route up. We hiked five hours to Periche where we would stay overnight and retrace our steps back to Lukla. It’s a slow trek down to avoid injury and because it’s the final opportunity to enjoy the natural beauty of this place. I used these days to reflect on the trek. I focused on what I learned, how I can integrate this knowledge into my life and also how I can share it with other members of the Spiritual Adrenaline community

Smoking & Recovery: I am proud to report my lungs functioned amazingly during the trek. I had no issues getting up steep inclines and hiking through difficult terrain, often times in exceptionally cold weather. After five years smoke free, my lungs functioned exceptionally well and past the “Everest Base Camp Test”. I remember when I was trying to quit smoking, reading materials that explained how lung function improves after one year, two years, three years, etc. I am proud to report that what I read back then has come true for me.  My lungs have the capacity to heal and they have. The good news for people in recovery is this is also true for the heart, liver and kidneys. Cutting off toxins and integrating a healthy lifestyle can aid healing in the lungs and other critical organs. Throughout the trek, all the way from Lukla to Everest Base Camp, cigarette butts littered the pristine natural beauty of the trail. Tourists, porters and Sherpa’s alike smoked to get their fix and more often than not, threw their butts on the ground, contaminating the very natural beauty which drives the mountain economy. Like any addict, the only thing smokers care about is getting their fix. The damage to their health and the majestic beauty of the mountain country in Nepal matters not. The only thing that matters is getting their fix.  I am glad I did not contribute to the cigarette butts littering the trail. I could not have completed this trek if I still smoked. I’m glad I quit and did not contribute to the destruction of the natural beauty of the Everest region. If you are trying to quit, visit our smoking cessation page at spiritualadrenqline.com.

The Benefits of Community: This trek was challenging for two reasons. First, we trekked more than thirty miles over some really tough terrain. A couple of days we trekked for hours at a time up steep mountain passes with inclines exceeding forty-five or fifty degrees. Second, the weather was 20 degrees Fahrenheit or thereabouts during the day and as cold as -10 to -20 Fahrenheit at night with the wind-chill. Dealing with the cold became a major emotional challenge that at times exceeded the challenge of the actual trek. I don’t think I would have continued up without the support of my five fellow trekkers. I raised the issue at breakfast one morning and they all confirmed the same was true for them. There is a power in being part of a community, whether it be a group fitness class at the gym, your home group, a class or club at an educational institutes or group therapy, that make challenging and sometimes down right unpleasant situations more palatable. Research has confirmed that people are far more likely to continue to participate in activities when they are part of a group. I think it’s fair to say I would have turned around and headed back to a warmer environment had I not been part of a group of trekkers. The same is true for my recovery. If I hadn’t had an amazing sponsor and home group in my first year, I am not sure if I would have hung around and succeeded. In so many ways, being “part of” increases the chances of success in so many areas of life.

Life Off the Grid: A wonderful part of this trip was living off the grid for almost two weeks. By “off the grid” I mean no access to cell communication, Wi-Fi or any other type of social media. Given the demands constantly placed on me (I bet you can relate), I am rarely present in the “now”. I am multi-tasking, constantly receiving texts and messages on my social media sites. So even if my body is present, my mind is often not. It’s off in other places thinking about other things. It took me three days to fully “withdraw” from the toxic effects of my electronic devices and social media. Once I did, I felt a profound sense of happiness. I am actually in Nepal, without any outside people, places or things to obstruct connecting with the Nepalese people, my fellow trekkers, and nature. My anxiety went away, I feel so “one” with the people and my surroundings. I truly feel like I am living, rather than trying keep up with the demands being placed on me by others back in New York. Working is not living: It took me almost fifty years to learn that. For most of the last two weeks, I’ve truly been alive.

Gratitude for the Little Things: One thing that becomes unmistakable in Katmandu, and even more I the mountain culture is how difficult life is here for the average person. This is not unique and true in many developing counties. However, up above the clouds in the mountain country of Nepal, it smacks you right in the face. People carry heavy loads of goods on narrow mountain passes for miles and miles for the equivalent of $1.50 a day. Women wash cloths in mountain steams barefoot in high elevation. Most live without running water and heat even though temperatures can -20 with wind-chill at night. Whenever I return from a trip like this, it grounds me and reminds me that on my worst day in New York City, I live in better conditions than so many people around the world. It reminds me to stop bitching in the morning when a train is late, or a waiter takes to long to deliver my food at a restaurant. It reminds me to stay in gratitude for all the blessings I have been given. This trek reinforced that I have no excuse but to maintain an attitude of gratitude for how fortunate I am.

Comfort Zone: This trek has been hard. Many times I considered turning back. Waking up in the freezing cold was jarring. Endless hours of trekking up steep inclines, sucks no matter how beautiful the surroundings. However, as the days passed and I successfully cleared physical and emotional hurdles, the sense of accomplishment pushed me to continue on. I developed an attitude of gratitude for my recovery program, my lungs which have been restored to health, and all the other blessings in my life. Accomplishing positive things can, in and of itself, become addictive. Addictive in a good way! It makes me want to challenge myself and push myself further. I am not looking to hide in what I know and makes me comfortable, but rather to learn new things and continue to grow, even if it makes me uncomfortable. That’s where life and recovery begins. Think about this: If you weren’t willing to step out of your comfort zone, you would have never stopped using drugs and alcohol? Probably not! So you’ve done it before and benefitted with a whole new lease on life. Why not try it again, in sobriety, and see where it takes you? That’s my attitude about life. When I step out of my comfort zone, even if it doesn’t take me where I want to go, it takes me where I need to be.

The Power of Nature: I was born, raised and live in the concrete jungle of New York City. It’s a place I love but also a place that makes me feel disconnected from nature and the natural rhythm of things. For the last two weeks I’ve been almost completely disconnected from the concrete jungle I know and have been almost exclusively surrounded by nature. Not just nature, but probably the most majestic and grand natural preserve in the world: Sagamartha National Park! which includes the Everest region, in Nepal. I was not only surrounded by nature but lived within its rules and in concert with its rhythms. I awoke when the sun came up, went to bed when it set, hiked during daylight and avoided trekking at night given how dangerous it is in the dark. I ate primarily foods gleaned from the land or animals that can live at high altitude, for example “yaks”.  I lived as one with nature rather then apart. It took me back to my instinctual roots. I feel like this is how I was meant to live. Most of the time, I am in a city with de minimus green spaces, where most of the social events happen after dark and most things I eat have no connection to my local community. Although I love where I live, I’ve felt much less stress and anxiety living within the natural cycle of things. It’s made me start thinking about how I can make changes to my lifestyle back home to try and keep a closer connection to nature. I think it’s easier to stay sober when you live within the natural cycle of things rather than an environment where man manipulates nature.

Active Sober Lifestyle: I could have gone to a beach resort as my vacation. At various times during the trek I wished I had. However, for all the reasons I already shared, this trek was where I wanted to be and what I wanted to do. Whether I went to a beach resort or on the trek, I think it’s critical to vacation in a manner consistent with my desire to stay sober. it’s self-defeating to put myself in a “party” like crazy environment when I purport to want to live sober. I say this because this is my second go round at sobriety. The first go round, I refused to leave the “party like crazy environment” and thought I’d be the “sober guy” surrounded by partying and all the decadence that comes with it. Guess what? I relapsed badly. However, I’ve learned from my past mistakes and now make sure to vacation in a manner consistent with my goals in sobriety and life. I place great emphasis on being surrounded by nature and by showing my gratitude where appropriate. For example, in addition to the trek I visited the spiritual birthplace of Buddha. Lastly, I try to incorporate an active sober component into the trips I take and places I go. All of theses things make it not only easier to stay sober but so much more fun. This trek has been a blessing and in some respects, life-changing in a positive way. I won’t be returning home the same as when I left. I’ve grown exponentially from my experience.   Come with me on an adventure.  Check out the “adventures” page at spiritualadrenaline.com.

 

 

Mount Everest Journal: My Trek From Lukla to Everest Base Camp: Day Eight

Today we set out for the goal of our trip, to reach the Mount Everest Base Camp at 17,600 feet. This is what we all came for, to see this place, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, so full of history of great success and tragic failure. On the way up we passed memorials to climbers and Sherpa’s who have died on this mountain. We trekked for hours, a total of eight, to get to the remote Base Camp location. Along the way, we passed majestic snow-capped mountains that encircled us in every direction. The mountains continued as far as the eye could see. To me, I felt like I arrived in God’s Cathedral. His home up above the clouds that is too beautiful to describe.  

The mountains did more than bring a tear to my eye. I was outright crying at various points. When I shared this with my group at dinner, others confirmed they also broke out crying from the awesome beauty of this place. The majesty of the place needs to be balanced by the effort to get there and the toll it takes on the body. Sherpa’s have genetically adapted over the years to live in these altitudes. I am not a Sherpa and neither are the majority of the people who come here. The price paid to enjoy this natural splendor is exhaustion, altitude sickness, digestive problems from contaminated water and the effects of many days of not sleeping (it’s difficult to sleep at this altitude where the oxygen level is 50% of sea level). However, it all seems worth it to see this beautiful place. A couple of times I said to myself “My eyes have seen the glory”. So balancing the good and not so good, we trek on.

You cannot miss the summit of Everest as you approach the Base Camp. It’s the only mountain that creates its own weather and has constant clouds surrounding it and snow blowing off of its summit. Simply put, the awesomeness of Everest cannot be missed or overlooked. It’s the king of all mountains even here at the top of the world. At 29,000 feet plus, it’s summit is the same height as the cruising altitude of 747 and larger aircraft. It’s nature at its most awesome and most dangerous.  

The Base Camp is much smaller than I expected. It’s amazing the history of this place and the people who have passed through it. To be honest, the size of the physical space is puny to compared to the hero’s and legends that have come out of it. As I perused the site, I started to imagine what the Camp must be like in prime season when it’s packed with climbers, Sherpas and other support personnel. It must be quite a scene indeed. I said a prayer for all those that have climbed in the past, will climb in the future and those who have given their lives trying to summit. With clouds coming in, it became very cold. It was time to leave and head back to our tea house before the weather turned for the worse. Our group had dinner that night and while we were all exhausted, we collectively shared about how awesome it was to be here, even if it was so cold. For many of us, this was an item on our bucket list that we could now check off. That night, I slept in my heated tea house bed as the temperature outside went as low as -20 degrees Fahrenheit with the wind-chill. Even with the cold and exhaustion, I pinched myself that I was here and told myself this was “a gift of the program”. But for my sobriety, I would not have been here!